Adventures of a Student Teacher

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It’s never, never, never the woman’s fault. No man has a right to raise a hand to a woman. No means no. […] The one regret I have is we call it domestic violence as if it’s a domesticated cat. It is the most vicious form of violence there is, because not only the physical scars are left, the psychological scars that are left. This whole culture for so long has put the onus on the woman. What were you wearing? What did you say? What did you do to provoke? That is never the appropriate question.

Joe Biden on Today this morning (h/t Joy)

(Source: fullcredit, via lisaedelstein)

5,134 notes

jasjuliet:

Who is Annmarie Richards?

"Annmarie Richards is a Jamaican woman who has raised 32 children, but not before she came from a broken home, in a struggling community herself. She experienced first-hand what it feels like to be a forgotten victim of Jamaica’s painful economic situation. She has since devoted her life to finding homeless children, raising them as her own, and giving them new opportunities.

It’s her goal to take children off the streets and integrate them into school systems, giving them a foundation to build a wonderful life.

Annmarie has helped numerous people turn their lives around. She has provided a home to women stuck in prostitution circles, drug addicts, and others. She not only takes troubled people off the streets, but she also helps them thrive in society!”

(Source: youtube.com, via amoebagrrrl)

56 notes

halftheskymovement:

Armed with laptops, blood-pressure monitors and pregnancy tests, the young women ride their bicycles to remote villages providing health, agricultural and IT services. They are known as “Infoladies,” and they are working to bring change to rural Bangladesh.  “I feel like a rockstar while passing through the village roads, as children clap when I pass them,” said 30-year-old Infolady Shahina Begum.  The program — launched by local not-for-profit Dnet to facilitate the broader dissemination of information technology in the country — has gained worldwide attention and may soon be replicated in other countries in Africa, Latin America and South Asia. “An Infolady is an entrepreneur. They are innovative, and sometimes they come up with services that were very much in demand but not available,” said the head of the initiative, Laura Mohiuddin. “These women are also agents of change.” Read more via Al Jazeera English

halftheskymovement:

Armed with laptops, blood-pressure monitors and pregnancy tests, the young women ride their bicycles to remote villages providing health, agricultural and IT services. They are known as “Infoladies,” and they are working to bring change to rural Bangladesh.

“I feel like a rockstar while passing through the village roads, as children clap when I pass them,” said 30-year-old Infolady Shahina Begum.

The program — launched by local not-for-profit Dnet to facilitate the broader dissemination of information technology in the country — has gained worldwide attention and may soon be replicated in other countries in Africa, Latin America and South Asia.

“An Infolady is an entrepreneur. They are innovative, and sometimes they come up with services that were very much in demand but not available,” said the head of the initiative, Laura Mohiuddin. “These women are also agents of change.”

Read more via Al Jazeera English

(via msformel)